configuration

Updating Thunderbird from 78 to 91 on Ubuntu

As you may know, I am a long user of an Ubuntu-flavored operating system (Kubuntu). So as I need a stable system, I usually stick with the Long Term Support (LTS) releases. Currently, my laptop runs Kubuntu 20.04.

At my new working place, people actively use calendar/email facilities. Hence, I have to start using an email client that supports this functionality. Our IT support recommends using Thunderbird, and I followed their advice. As usual in Linux distros, I have installed a Thunderbird version using my package manager and configured my email client according to the recommendations.

However, after I started to use it, I have faced issues in calendar functionality (e.g., its inability to synchronize event data) that were very difficult to triage. I checked some forums looking for explanations of some particular error codes and how to resolve them. There, I discovered that the calendar sub-system was improved considerably in Thunderbird 91.0. I checked my version of Thunderbird, and it was 78.13.x. After I found that, I decided to update Thunderbird. However, at that time, I did not manage to find a Personal Package Archive (PPA) or a deb file with this newer version. Therefore, I decided to wait until a new Ubuntu version (21.10) would be released because I thought it might bring Thunderbird 91. Unfortunately, this did not happen for older releases, and I decided to install Thunderbird 91 manually. In this article, I describe how I updated Thunderbird from version 78 to 91.

Kubuntu: Configuring Timer Widget

I like to work using an adapted Pomodoro technique, therefore I added a timer widget to my desktop (I use Kubuntu as my operating system). Unfortunately, in Kubuntu by default when the timer ends, there is no sound notification about this event. Moreover, the set of predefined timer intervals does not fit my needs. In this short post, I explain how to make the timer widget more comfortable.

Configuring Python Workspace: Poetry

In the previous article, I have described my approach to configure Python workspace. I mentioned there that I do not use poetry because it “cannot be used to specify dependencies when you work with Jupyter notebooks”. However, people (@BasicWolf and @iroln) from the Russian tech website Habr recommended me to look at poetry closer, as it apparently can fulfil all my requirements. “Two heads are better than one”, and I started to explore this tool deeper. Indeed, I have managed to fulfil all my requirements with this tool but with some configurations. In this post, I describe how to configure it to meet my requirements and how to use it.