how-to

How to Include Diff into Git Commit Message

De facto, git is a standard version control system now. Not surprisingly that I use it for my projects. Working on a project, I often face with a situation when I have made a number of changes, and I need to describe them in a commit message. Of course, I try following the line when every change results in a new commit, however, on practice, sometime I face with the situation when I need to describe a number of changes in one commit message. If there are a number of changes (or peculiarities), mentioning all of them could be a challenge. Of course, you can open an additional terminal and do diffing, however, it would be great if this information is included in the commit message.

Moving Website to Hugo Modules

Hugo 0.56.0 introduced one notable feature called “Hugo Modules”. Hugo Modules allow you to add more flexibility to your Hugo project organization. Using this feature, you can import different modules that will implement one or more Hugo component types. For instance, you can use one module that provides layout for your website, and another one to add more shortcodes, etc. Moreover, this feature enables you to mount your own directories or files that are not necessary tracked by Hugo.

For my webpage, I use a modified “Academic” theme that has been recently renamed to Wowchemy. As a part of the rebranding, the author migrated it to use Hugo Modules. I have devoted some time to understand how Hugo Modules work and how to migrate my website to use this feature. This blog post is mostly a memo for myself, however, it may be useful for others as well.