vscode

VSCode Snippets to Speed Up Time/Task Management Files Creation

In the series of articles on my time/task management approach, one article is dedicated to the tool set (VSCode + OrgMode) I use to track my tasks and performance. Since then, a number of people has asked me to share the templates of the week, month and year files what I did after the first request. However, recently I have discovered an approach that allows me to speed up the creation of the year, month and week files. In this article, I share the details of this improvement.

Starting New Python Project in VSCode

In the previous article, I have described how poetry can be used to configure Python workspace and to create a new Python package project. Although poetry creates the structure of a package and adds some boilerplate code, in order to develop this package in VSCode we need to do some additional configurations. In this post, I describe how to start developing a new Python package project in VSCode.

Using VSCode as a Default Git Editor

Last several years I use git as my version control system (VCS) both for personal and work projects. If you are working in a team, usage of a VCS brings you a lot of benefits like change tracking, history viewing, merge issues resolving, etc. However, I have found it very handy to use even for personal projects: with git I can try different solutions simultaneously and then select the better one. Moreover, I can easily remember what I have done for a project recently. This task becomes much easier if commit messages for repository changes are written clearly and in accordance with the patterns and rules recommended by the VCS. Developers have already developed the best practices how to write commit messages. I refer the interested reader, e.g., to the article written by Chris Beams. In this article, I explain how VSCode can help writing commit messages in accordance with the rules.

Managing VSCode Extensions

The last several years Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code (VSCode) is my favorite text editor. Thanks to the amazing “LaTeX Workshop” plugin, I started using it as a LaTeX editor to write my research papers, and eventually I moved most of my everyday routines there. Currently, I use it for Python and Rust (I’ve just started) development, web development. Even this post I write in this editor due to its great support of markdown language.

The opportunity to use one editor for so many different tasks is made possible by its great plugin subsystem and all those people, who have been spending hours and hours (thank you!!!) to develop wonderful extensions. With the lapse of time, your Extensions side bar tab will be populated with tens of different extensions, which are quite difficult to remember all. In this post, I will explain how to manage extensions, in particular, how to list all installed extensions, download them for offline use, and install them.

The code snippets are also available in the GitHub repository.